DSA "Town Hall" Meeting

 You’re Invited!

image clipartWho: Divinity School Students 

What: A town-hall’ish meeting to discuss ways to improve everyday life at Swift 

Where: Swift 208 

When: Thursday, 10/24, 4:30-6:30pm

Why 1: Due to the successful business strategies of our student run coffee shop, the DSA has some additional funds to spend this year. We want to hear your voice. Should we purchase new printers? Plan more social events? How about a Jukebox? Please come share your ideas. 

Why 2: Free food and drinks.  

 

National Coming Out Day Reflection: Marcella Wilkinson

The Evolution of My Sacred Place and Sacred Face

By Marcella Wilkinson

Not long ago, I participated in a sacred event. I found myself in the company of women like me. Black. Beautiful. Lesbian… Free. This event, as protected as it was, was a reminder of the pseudo sacred spaces I have erected… take, for instance, my ‘closet’:

I was under the impression that I could express myself fully, in the closet…

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National Coming Out Day Reflection: "E"

Note:  Our hybridity often means that coming out, even as an ally, in certain communities is risky…

How My Mind Changed: A List of Resources

Bart Ehrman, prolific scholar of the New Testament, in the Preface to one of his popular books gives an autobiographical account of his transition from being an evangelical who could "answer any apparent contradiction and resolve any potential discrepancy in the Word of God, whether in the Old or New Testament" (Jesus, Interrupted xi), to the kind of thinker he became after beginning to study historical-critical scholarship. Not everything in his autobiography coincides with my experience, however, his description of the process of beginning to think differently does:

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National Coming Out Day Reflection: Olivia Bustion

THE TROUBLE WITH RIGOR

Or, How Can a Tough-minded Gay Lady Command a Hearing?

Last year a group of queer students (and their allies) met with the Faculty Diversity Committee to reflect on our experiences at the Divinity School.  One person lamented the fact that the Divinity School, like academic theology in general, has at times dismissed queer theology as mere “boutique theology”:  a discourse that, like a boutique, could only ever appeal to an exclusive clientele of highly specialized connoisseurs.  A well-intentioned but problematic suggestion came up:  perhaps the University of Chicago’s commitment to rigor means that any argument will command a hearing so long as one argues it rigorously.

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